Homeowner’s unwanted houseguest protected by law from eviction

Had the bird settled itself in before or after nesting season,the homeowner could have tried to shoo the bird.
Had the bird settled itself in before or after nesting season,the homeowner could have tried to shoo the bird. (Photo: iStock)

Sometimes when a person comes back from vacation they can find themselves saddled with an unwanted houseguest of the human kind, like a sibling.

A Calgary, Alta., man recently came back from vacation and found an unwanted houseguest of the feathered kind in his attic that he legally can’t get rid of: a woodpecker.

How did the bird even make it into the attic? It wasn’t through an open window, no, the industrious woodpecker bored a hole through the side of the house and began nesting.

Initially, he tried different ways of getting rid of the bird, from spraying it with water to making a fake crow and trying to scare it away, to yelling and screaming. Nothing worked and the bird was content to stay where it was.

However, the man was not content with his new houseguest, as after all, the bird isn’t paying rent and is making a lot of noise, not to mention a big mess.

Fed up, he called the Humane Society and got some unwelcome news: he cannot touch the bird, even to move it, because it is protected by law.

Turns out this particular bird is a northern flicker known for making a cacophony of noise and causing property damage all in the name of finding a mate. Northern flickers are not allowed to be disturbed during nesting season in Canada under the federal Migratory Birds Convention Act.

Had the bird settled itself in before or after nesting season, the homeowner could have tried to shoo the bird but as of right now he’s out of luck. The law is so strict that he cannot even yell at the bird.

Meaning no matter how much the bird bothers him, the man cannot bother the bird, regardless of the havoc the bird is causing.

Looks like his unwanted houseguest had the last laugh a la Woody Woodpecker.

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