Does your car legally have to have four wheels?

The next time you take your car out for a spin, please Yabba Dabba Doo make sure you drive on all four wheels.
The next time you take your car out for a spin, please Yabba Dabba Doo make sure you drive on all four wheels. (Photo: Reuters)

Yabba Dabba Doo!

The following story features a driver who seemed to take a page from The Flintstones, trying to drive with fewer than four wheels.

The driver, in St. John’s, Nfld., was spotted making their way on only three wheels, after which a complaint was called in to police, with a witness saying sparks were “flying everywhere”.

Luckily nobody was injured and the driver was taken to police headquarters and is under investigation for impaired driving.

This scenario brings up an interesting question: does a car legally have to have four wheels to be able to be driven?

Transport Canada sets out what makes a car “street legal” under the Motor Vehicle Tire Safety Regulations, which are housed under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act. The regulations outline the proper kind of tires that have to be used, as well as the classes of equipment and prescribed standards for tires and other equipment but don’t appear to specifically mention that a car has to have four tires in order to be operational.

However, the regulations do spell out that a “passenger car” cannot include “a three-wheeled vehicle” and also specifically set out what a three-wheeled vehicle is. The regulations also explain that Canadian vehicles have to be in compliance with United Nations transport regulations.

If that doesn’t catch the four-wheel requirement, there is also the little matter of the dangerous operation of motor vehicles being considered a crime under the Criminal Code of Canada. It’s highly likely that a person trying to drive with only three wheels would be charged under that provision.

So the next time you take your car out for a spin, please Yabba Dabba Doo make sure you drive on all four wheels!

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