Creepy clown sightings in Canada and U.S. result in criminal charges

Clown sightings, fake reports and criminal activity connected to clowns is at an unusually high level.
Clown sightings, fake reports and criminal activity connected to clowns is at an unusually high level. (Photo: Facebook/Wasco Clown)

Clown sightings happen from time to time, especially as Halloween is approaching. This year though, the amount of clown sightings, fake reports and criminal activity connected to clowns is at an unusually high level.

In Canada alone, there have been numerous clown-related incidents:

  • A woman from Glace Bay, N.S. reported an incident to police in which she was forced to stop her car because a clown was standing in the middle of the road. She was then forced to reverse because the clown ran directly at her;
  • Halifax police are investigating a photo of a clown standing near a high school that was posted on social media; and
  • In Gatineau, Que., teenagers were photographed wearing clown masks with chains and chasing other children from a park.

Police have been warning people against this type of behaviour, simply because it’s illegal. Scaring a person could result in harassment charges and making false sighting claims could result in mischief charges, or worse.

“There are things that police can do to attempt to stop you from such behaviour to prevent you from causing further upset”, Cpl. Dal Hutchinson of Halifax RCMP told Metro News Halifax.

The United States has also seen a series of clown-related incidents, including:

  • A large number of false clown sightings. The New York Times reports that 12 arrests in 10 states are connected to false reports of “creepy clown” sightings;
  • Several schools in different states have been closed or put on lockdown after creepy clown sightings;
  • A 13-year-old Virginia teenager has been charged with one count to kill by electronic message, because she asked someone posing as a clown on social media to kill one of her teachers; and
  • Two fast-food restaurants in Phoenix, Arizona were robbed by people wearing clown masks.

Some are speculating that the dramatic rise in clown sightings, false reports and hoaxes could be related to the movie remake of Stephen King’s classic novel “It”, coming out in 2017. The book/movie is about, you guessed it, a clown who preys on young children.

In response to the clown hysteria going on right now, the master horror novelist himself has told people to chill out, tweeting:

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