Cheese please: Newfoundland woman calls 911 over pizza ‘emergency’

The woman thought it was appropriate to call the number reserved for real life-or-death emergencies and complain.
The woman thought it was appropriate to call the number reserved for real life-or-death emergencies and complain. (Photo: REUTERS/Mark Makela)

A Newfoundland woman recently called 911 because of a dire emergency: her pizza was missing that cheesy goodness.

Utterly beside herself, the woman thought it was appropriate to call the number reserved for real life-or-death emergencies and complain.

Constable Geoff Higdon with the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, told CBC News, "I'm not sure if by calling us they assumed there was some sort of action we could take, or what the situation was, but of course we advised the individual they just needed to speak with the manager of the company and not the police."

On the heels of this incident, comes another strange 911 call: a Greenfield, Wis., woman called 911 due to a cat emergency. Apparently, her kitty was in attack mode, and the woman told the 911 operator “we’re kind of hostages in our own house.”

Eventually animal control was called, and the cat was taken away.

Sadly, these types of non-emergency calls are nothing new for emergency operators.

Recently, E-Comm911, British Columbia’s largest 911 call centre released a top ten list of reasons not to call 911, among them such ridiculous items as: complaining to police about a coffee shop that refused to give them a refill, grumbling about a noisy air conditioning system, and reporting an issue with a vending machine.

Though the above may seem to be a joke, it’s not, because calling 911 for non-emergencies ties up phone lines and may cause someone who has a real crisis to be forced to wait.

Not to mention, it is illegal to call 911 under false pretences or with a false emergency and people who do so can, and have been, charged with public mischief.

So, for the love of cheese, please do not call 911 if your pizza order is wrong, or if someone stole your toothbrush.

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