How will Trump’s travel ban affect Canadians with dual citizenship?

Shanez Tabarsi is greeted by her daughter after traveling from Iran February 6, 2017. (Photo: REUTERS/Brian Snyder)
Shanez Tabarsi is greeted by her daughter after traveling from Iran February 6, 2017. (Photo: REUTERS/Brian Snyder)

As of Sunday morning, U.S. President Donald Trump’s travel ban on seven predominantly Muslim countries has been suspended by an appeals court. For the time being, some travelers and all refugees from those countries can now enter the United States.

Not surprisingly, there have been repercussions for Canadian residents who also have citizenship in one of those countries. The latest fallout from the now-suspended ban has been affected Canadian permanent residents having their Nexus travel cards revoked.

Canadian lawyers and law students have responded to the events surrounding the travel ban much like their American counterparts by setting up shop in airports across the country and attempting to help dual citizens caught up in the drama.

Toronto lawyer Corey Shefman told the CBC that the situation is causing confusion, "We've been telling people and our American colleagues have been telling people, if you think you're going to be affected by the travel ban, travel now and travel quick because we don't know how long this stay is going to last."

So what can Canadians who are also dual citizens of the banned countries to do? Outside of the Nexus cards being revoked, it is business as usual at U.S. airports during the ban’s suspension. A number of U.S. states against the ban plan to face off against lawyers for the federal government Tuesday as both sides attempt to prove their points for and against the ban.

If you are a citizen of one of the banned countries, consulting with a lawyer about your current situation and future travel plans could be prudent for your peace of mind.
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