Five most popular blogs of 2016

There was no shortage of interesting topics for Findlaw.ca’s editorial team to write on in 2016.
There was no shortage of interesting topics for Findlaw.ca’s editorial team to write on in 2016. (Photo: iStock)

Gather ‘round folks, it’s that time of year again. Yes, that time in which many publications look back at their most popular and fascinating articles of the year. Think Barbara Walters without the interviews. Not wanting to be left out of all the holiday storytelling, here are Findlaw.ca’s top five blogs of the year.

  1. To census or not to census?

    2016 was the year in which the government long-form census made its glorious return. The return of the census brought out the fan boy or girl in all of us, so much so that Canadians crashed the Statistics Canada website. Many Canadians had one big question burning in their brains: “Do I have to fill out the 2016 census?” Turns out, they did.

  2. Coins, coins, coins

    Money is almost always on people’s minds, so it was no surprise that our blog about how many coins people can legally use was a hit! Turns out many weren’t aware that you can only pay forty dollars in coins if you only use toonies that amount to no more than $10 or that. . . oh heck, just read the blog.

  3. Do your children really exist?

    This story had a lot of people chuckling. A Saskatoon, Sask. lawyer was repeatedly asked by the Canada Revenue Agency to prove that his children exist. His response? He sent them a bunch of pictures with the caption, “best fake family ever.”

  4. There’s a foul odour at the end of this tunnel

    When you buy a condominium, finding a smelly hidden tunnel is definitely not one of the problems you can anticipate. Toronto, Ont. condo residents noticed a bad smell in their building and were shocked to learn that there was a secret tunnel in the basement. Needless to say they took the developer to court.

  5. Of mice and buildings
  6. A Vancouver, B.C. building had a mice infestation problem. The building tried to get rid of the mice by placing traps on the walls but the cacophony of squealing, dying mice disturbed employees of a law office. One fed up employee took the property manager to the human rights tribunal, because she alleged he wasn’t taking the female employees complaints seriously. She lost.

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