Evicted tenants leave animal feces, $30,000 worth of damage behind

Once they were forced to leave, they left loads of garbage and animal feces all over the property.
Once they were forced to leave, they left loads of garbage and animal feces all over the property. (Photo: Supplied/Simon Andrew)

A landlord who rented out his Kingston, Ont. house to a “respectable” couple two years ago got it back in horrific condition, as the couple left behind nine tons of garbage, including animal waste, used tampons and diabetic needles.

Though landlord Simon Andrew started eviction proceedings with the Ontario Landlord and Tenant Board once he found out that the couple kept livestock on his rental property, the process took six months. In the meantime, his tenants caused a lot of damage, which he estimates will cost him around $30,000 to repair.

Before renting his home to the couple two years ago, Andrew received references from the couple and interviewed them and it looked like everything checked out. . . until the couple moved in and started causing havoc.

Not only did they bring barn animals into the house, which included a goat, chickens, pigeons and rabbits but they also “grease bombed” the house, meaning they put greasy meats in the oven and left the door open, which splattered and damaged the walls.

Once they were forced to leave, they left loads of garbage and animal feces all over the property, as well as overdue bills.

Could anything have been done while the eviction process was ongoing? A complaint could have been made to the city of Kingston that they were keeping livestock on the property. The city forbids the keeping of livestock in residential homes.

Still, given the degree of damage Andrew’s tenants were doing to his property, one has to wonder why it took the LTB so long to issue an eviction order.

Though tenants can delay an eviction order by appealing it to the Superior Court of Ontario, here the order itself took a long time to be issued.

"In most instances, the LTB hears these kinds of cases within 25 days of when the application was filed and issues a decision within five days of the hearing. That said, either the landlord or the tenant can ask for an adjournment to a later date," Whitney Miller of Social Justice Tribunals Ontario told CBC News in an email.

CBC News reached out to the LTB but they declined to comment on this case.

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