CRTC slams Toronto condo for denying owners access to Internet provider

The CRTC threatened the complex with steep action if they failed to comply.
The CRTC threatened the complex with steep action if they failed to comply. (Photo: iStock)

The CRTC recently released a decision that will force a Toronto condominium to allow Internet provider Beanfield Technologies, a relatively new ISP to serve the building.

The CRTC threatened the complex with steep action if they failed to comply, mainly that they would forbid other Internet providers from operating in the complex. Other providers including Rogers, Bell, were allowed to provide service but the condo didn’t grant access to Beanfield.

The condo insisted that there wasn’t enough space for Beanfield to install its network but Beanfield said that wasn’t so and even if that were the case, it would build its own conduit to facilitate access. The CRTC was satisfied with Beanfield’s response and saw little reason for the company to have been excluded.

This is not the first time the regulator had to threaten such action. In the last three years, the CRTC made similar threats in two other cases where providers were refused access, despite regulations that forbid such behaviour. Additionally, the rules forbid building owners from reducing consumer choice by making deals with Internet providers.

More competition among Internet providers would likely see prices drop by providing consumers with more choice, which is why the CRTC pointed out that it created rules to encourage this competition.

The CRTC gave the complex 120 days to comply with the order, failing which they may make good on the threat to stop existing Internet providers from providing services in the complex.

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